Purples of Autumn

I have been working on a neck warmer/gaiter/cowl in a stitch that looks like ears of wheat.  It was suggested that gold would be more suitable than the purple I had chosen, but I think of purples as being autumnal as well.  Here’s some images of autumn purples from my garden.

mallow.JPG

chard.JPG

crabapple

sedum.JPG

So I made one neckwarmer  in purple, one in gold. Here we see the mysteries of row gauge illustrated.
harvest draft

The purple gaiter is in Kumara, from Classic Elite, an amazingly luscious blend of merino and baby camel. The reddish gold is  Lima, from Rowan,  a cabled alapaca blend that is luminous and soft.

Lima
I haven’t seen this cabled construction since Swa-Laine. (Anyone remember that one?) In fact, my first neck gaiter was in blue Swa-Laine, about 15 years ago.  It felted if you looked at it warmly, I imagine Lima will felt easily as well.

Kumara recommended gauge: 18 sts and 24 rows over 4 inches.
Lima recommended gauge: 20 sts and 26 rows over 4 inches.

I figured that if I knit the Lima at the same stockinette gauge as the Kumara, they would end up fairly close in size.  Width-wise yes, but not in the length. Working Lima in a gauge to match the Kumara didn’t affect the row gauge much at all.   Normally, this isn’t a problem, but in a pattern with a fixed number of repeats for the length, it will be one. Now, a neck gaiter that is an inch shorter than you want it isn’t a crisis, you can always work another repeat. In a sweater, it could be a big problem, especially if you are working set-in or raglan sleeves. And when subsituting yarn, you have to remember you will need more if you have to work more rows.

I just don’t know why the row gauge doesn’t always change as the stitch gauge changes.  There must be is a connection between how one person knits as well, just as in stitch gauge.   The highly productive Gale has offered to test knit.  It will be interesting to see how her row gauge turns out.

MLE

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11 responses to “Purples of Autumn

  1. I hate row gauge. Mine’s compressed, so when knitting something by number of repeats vs knitting x inches? I’m doomed. DOOMED.

  2. if i didn’t know better i think someone has been taking photo classes from she shoots… hmmm just sayin

  3. These are wonderful- I’m looking forward to a pattern.
    Whne I re athe end of your post I thught OMG , when did I offer to test knit???!! Then I remembered the other Gale , no one prefixes me with the phrase “highly productive” 🙂

  4. And also no one describes me as the Gale who checks her typos before she hits send. Sorry.

  5. After I get back from the market with Peter, I am going stash diving for something cuddly. I think there’s some gold coloured Rowan Kid Mohair upstairs somewhere. There ought to be enough of that to get going on.

  6. That is interesting — and such a good point about needing to calculate for extra yarn when knitting something bigger! The colors are stunning on both of those, and perfectly autumnal (golds and purples just scream autumn to me).

  7. I always have issues w/row gauge more than stitch gauge, oddly enough. I’m constantly switching out the yarns for something I have/like vs what the pattern calls for.

    Can’t wait to see it test knit up! The colors are beautiful.

  8. Love, love the colors.

    We are big on gaiters here. Much safer and cozier than scarves, especially when doing farm chores.

  9. A pox on row gauge.

  10. Lovely!

    And no, nobody wants to administer money donated to the museum. But there will be a plug in the pattern to do so. Glad you like the concept–I hope it lives up to everyone’s expectations.

  11. those yarns sound like some nice fibers to work with. I haven’t tried either one!

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